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...Involve your colleagues Talking with colleagues is one of the best ways to get over the worry of other adults witnessing your storytelling. You could usefully discuss questions such as what should go on in storytime and how to manage...
...What you need space to stand and move around freelyWhat you do Ask the children to stand in a space. Make sure there is plenty of room to move around. Warm up by familiarising yourselves with parts of the body. Can you touch your head? Your...
...Some ideas for role-play Play firemen with hoses and buckets. Make a fire station in the shed and use wheeled toys for rescue vehicles. Be a window cleaner, with a bucket and sponges, squeegees and cloths. Don’t forget a step ladder...
...Preparation If you’ve heard the story from someone else, you will probably remember the other person’s voice as they told it. You won’t have to perform the task of ‘lifting the story off the page’. Instead, you may have to work out how...
...What you need a toothbrush a hairbrush a breakfast bowl and spoon children’s clothing shoes a large box or basketWhat you do Discuss your morning routines (see Tips for talk). Examine all the items and talk about their uses. Place all...
...When A usual routine is for storytelling sessions to occur at the end of a morning or afternoon. The pattern has its plus-points, such as calming the children down before going home – but there are several disadvantages, from mothers...
...What are they learning? Storytelling gives children a reason to listen and something to remember. There are many benefits. Social – storytelling teaches them to be part of a group Coming together for a storytelling session gives young...
...What makes a good storytelling session? Experienced storytellers know the answer is often hard to pin down. Sometimes a story can be told in a completely different way from what was planned – and work! Sometimes a story can fall flat, even...