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...Introduction Children love finding pictures and objects for collections. In this activity, the focus is about finding objects that correspond to the different letters and sounds of the alphabet. However, ensure that this activity does...
...Introduction Copying sounds, particularly the sound of voices, is a great way to help children co-ordinate their ears and brains. In addition to this, echo games also help with: speech articulation; sound discrimination; concentration...
...Introduction Singing supports learning to speak, listen, read and write. They are the way children experiment with the words they know and get a feeling for rhythm and alliteration. Sing in the garden, on walks and visits, while waiting...
...Introduction Create a sound table and make it a permanent feature of your setting.What you need A few starter objects for your chosen sound of the day or the week.What you do Introduce the children to the idea of a sound table. Talk about...
...Introduction Listening to a beat and tapping is the first step to clapping.What you need Paper or plastic plates Chopsticks or pencilsHelpful hints You need a plate and stick for each child. Collect a basket of objects from around the room,...
...Introduction Making their own letters adds another dimension to learning about sounds. It enables children to feel the shapes of the letters as they make them, which will help with early writing.What you need Salt dough or clay Craft boards...
...Introduction Traditional games are in danger of being lost if they are not introduced to very young children at home and in early years settings. Many of these traditional games encourage listening and sound discrimination, and others can...
...Introduction The activities on this page give children the opportunity to practise recognising different phonemes. Challenging them to fish letters that make up CVC words, initials and names supports early writing skills and spelling.What...
...Introduction The ability to keep a steady beat is an essential skill in learning to read. It helps children transition from beginners to fluent readers.What you need Simple instruments, e.g. shakers, drums, or tambourinesHelpful hints...
...Introduction Children need regular practise at recognising phonemes and finding pictures or words to match in order to become better readers and writers. The activities on this page support this in exciting and fun ways.What you need...