Bloomsbury Early Years - Search Results
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...Introduction Traditional games are in danger of being lost if they are not introduced to very young children at home and in early years settings. Many of these traditional games encourage listening and sound discrimination, and others can...
...Introduction Incorporating games with sounds into the daily life of your setting is one easy way to make sure you are exposing children to the key components of speaking and listening. The games need not be long or complicated: for most...
...Introduction Singing supports learning to speak, listen, read and write. They are the way children experiment with the words they know and get a feeling for rhythm and alliteration. Sing in the garden, on walks and visits, while waiting...
...Introduction Create a sound table and make it a permanent feature of your setting.What you need A few starter objects for your chosen sound of the day or the week.What you do Introduce the children to the idea of a sound table. Talk about...
...Introduction Predicting missing words is very useful way to practise listening and anticipation skills.What you need No additional resourcesHelpful hints Children need to be able to see you as they will watch you for signals!What you do...
...Introduction Making and listening to sounds as you and your friends make them, is a key feature of learning to read. In this activity children experiment with different sounds by adding different objects to shakers and listening...
...Introduction Music making, particularly getting involved in activities with a steady beat, helps build links between brain cells, co-ordination and listening skills.What you need Some musical baby wrist toys, e.g. bells and rattles. If you...
...Introduction This activity helps development in many areas, including fine movement and control, and linking words with actions, copying and imitating.What you need Washable felt-tipped pens Small, self-adhesive labels A selection of star...
...Introduction Bright colours (red, green, orange, yellow) stimulate the brain and encourage lively activity. Darker colours and most shades of blue are more calming and relaxing. What colours should you use to paint the rooms in your setting...
...Introduction Not only is finger painting great fun for children, but it also helps children to isolate single fingers, particularly their index or first finger, which will help with early writing skills. Using hands and fingers to feel...